Author Box
Articles Categories
All Categories
Articles Resources

Glide Shot Put - Is the Left Leg Important?

April 17, 2012 | Comments: 0 | Views: 173

The glide shot put is probably the most difficult event to coach in the throws. After nearly twenty years of throwing, coaching, observing, and researching, I feel comfortable working with the glide, but still acknowledge that there is always more to learn. The glide shot put is deceptively simple. Many new throwers can be taught how to glide well enough to add distance to their power position with only a day or two of work. However, to maximize the effectiveness of the glide to get everything possible out of the throw takes a whole lot more work.

There is a lot of debate right now as to whether or not the glide shot put is a viable technique, or whether the rotational shot put is superior. Without getting too far into the debate, I think anybody who has worked with athletes has seen that there are some athletes better suited for each.

On the positive side of the glide shot put, it is fairly simple to teach the basics, it provides consistent results in a competition setting, and outside factors such as ring surface or weather conditions have much less impact than with the rotational shot put. On the other side, it is a fast, explosive movement that can be difficult for the coach to see and diagnose technique breakdowns and research seems to indicate that the upside potential is more limited than the rotational shot put. While high level shot putting requires relatively high strength levels whether gliding or rotating, the glide technique usually requires a higher level of strength than the rotational technique. The maintenance of this higher strength levels (lifting heavier weights) increases the risk of injury for the athlete.

Understanding the long-short versus the short-long glide, Feurbach versus the European glide, leaving from the heel versus the toe, letting the hips drop into the circle, static start versus dynamic start, all take time to learn and understand.

In my experience, one of the big keys for coaching the glide shot put is a focus on the left foot (right handed thrower). I look for the left foot to remain dorsiflexed (keep the toe up) and for the left leg to remain relatively straight throughout the glide. A common error is to let the left leg cross the right in the crouch position. Keeping the left leg straight allows the hips to drop and get full extension and push off with the right heel. The athlete then needs to land with an open left foot at the toeboard. This is something that many experienced shot putters do instinctively.

For beginners it is important to emphasize landing with the left foot open, as this aligns the hips for delivery in double support. I've found that many beginner or novice shot putters tend to land with the left foot facing the back of the circle, in an effort to "stay wrapped up." Once double support is reached at the front of the circle, the hips need to be aligned essentially down the left sector line, with the shoulder axis lagging behind. This sets up a position where the right hip and lower body can drive linearly into the direction of the throw and maximize the separation of the upper body, creating the "backward C."

Monitoring the left foot throughout the throw can usually tell the coach what the athlete is doing well, or not so well. Seeing the left foot cross the right leg, point the toe, or land closed will tell you what the athlete needs to correct.

For more articles, videos and other information about the shot put, discus, and hammer throws, check out http://www.coachthethrows.com.

Source: EzineArticles
Was this Helpful ?

 
0
 
0
 
Rate this Article
 vote(s)
Feedback
Print
Re-Publish

Article Tags:

Shot Putters

,

Glide Technique

,

Glide Shot Put

,

How To Shot Put

,

Shot Put Drills

LED boat trailer lights are designed to offer high-power output and low-power consumption for ultra-bright and reliable illumination; they are sealed to resist UV-radiation, corrosion, and water

By: Simon Liva l Recreation & Sports > Boating l December 12, 2012 lViews: 274

All these scooters are highly durable as they have been made using qualitative materials. They are ideal for extreme tricks, jumps and stunts for youngsters and are extremely light in weight. All

By: Simon Liva l Recreation & Sports > Extreme l November 24, 2012 lViews: 413

The interest in BMXing has grown massively over the past few years. With BMX hitting its peak in the 80's with freestyle riders, the sport has never looked back. Even more impressively BMX racing is

By: Alan Trotter l Recreation & Sports > Cycling l October 24, 2012 lViews: 452

Mountain biking has grown vastly over the years from simple, open entry competitions to global world cup and olympic events. There are still local enthusiasts and the sport has a dedicated following.

By: Philip Loughran l Recreation & Sports > Mountain Biking l July 10, 2012 lViews: 248

It's unfortunate but true that although summer holidays such as the 4th of July and Labor Day offer some of the best opportunities for families to get out and enjoy some quality time together, with

By: Dexter Luck l Recreation & Sports > Boating l July 10, 2012 lViews: 585

The term "Klunker" that for years became synonymous with heavy, clumsy machines, was actually the model of bike made by the Schwinn company that had something to do with the origins of freestyle

By: John D Meyers l Recreation & Sports > Mountain Biking l July 10, 2012 lViews: 270

Shoes are essential part of apparels, they protect your feet, support leg and balance body weight. In order to train yourself to fitness, a pair of suitable aerobics shoes or training shoes is always

By: Tarima Singhl Recreation & Sports > Track and Fieldl June 06, 2012 lViews: 294

A couple of weeks ago, we were at a meet where a competitor was in the process of entering the shot put circle and realized he had not taken the Tshirt that he was wearing over his jersey off. With

By: Dave Hahnl Recreation & Sports > Track and Fieldl June 05, 2012 lViews: 198

It is important for coaches to formulate a written coaching philosophy that acts as a guidepost in their decision making. This article highlights the author's coaching philosophy.

By: Dave Hahnl Recreation & Sports > Track and Fieldl April 18, 2012 lViews: 135

Whether your goal is to find your way around while hiking or getting through traffic without losing your way, you will appreciate the efficiency of the Garmin Montana 650t handheld GPS for keeping

By: Eugene Brooksl Recreation & Sports > Track and Fieldl April 02, 2012 lViews: 196

Edwin Moses ran the 400 meter hurdles for 10 years without being defeated. No athlete can boast such an accomplishment. Does this make him the best track athlete ever?

By: Darrell Garrettl Recreation & Sports > Track and Fieldl March 20, 2012 lViews: 159

A popular track and field event, pole vaulting demands speed and agility. The process of running and using a pole to vault over a barrier has a defined history from ancient times to modern day. A

By: J J Whitel Recreation & Sports > Track and Fieldl February 28, 2012 lViews: 161

A couple of weeks ago, we were at a meet where a competitor was in the process of entering the shot put circle and realized he had not taken the Tshirt that he was wearing over his jersey off. With

By: Dave Hahnl Recreation & Sports > Track and Fieldl June 05, 2012 lViews: 198

It is important for coaches to formulate a written coaching philosophy that acts as a guidepost in their decision making. This article highlights the author's coaching philosophy.

By: Dave Hahnl Recreation & Sports > Track and Fieldl April 18, 2012 lViews: 135

In the state of Wisconsin, it is common for high school throwers to take all three of their attempts in the prelim or final in succession. I am not sure if this practice is common in other states as

By: Dave Hahnl Recreation & Sports > Track and Fieldl April 05, 2011 lViews: 103

Discuss this Article

comments powered by Disqus