Author Box
Articles Categories
All Categories
Articles Resources

Easy Recipe to Make Your Own Chicken Stock

March 28, 2012 | Comments: 0 | Views: 159

The soul of any soup is its stock. If you have a weak stock or broth you will have a weak soup, no matter how good the other ingredients are. With so many decent stocks and broths available in stores, why should you make your own? For me, it boils down to three simple reasons. First, I can control the amount of fat and salt and end up with a healthier stock. Second, I can use up ingredients from other meals. Third, and most important, is that it simply tastes better. When's the last time you heard someone say "this has too much flavor"?

A good chicken stock starts off with simple ingredients. Obviously, you will need chicken bones and cartilage. This can come from a roasted chicken or bought as is. You can add meat if you like, but it's the bones and connective tissue that will add the most flavor.

Aside from the chicken you will need some aromatic vegetables, with the classic choices being carrots, onions and celery. Leeks, fennel root and parsnips are other veggies that I like to use. And I almost always add a clove of garlic or two. Regardless of which ones you choose, they should be chopped roughly, not too small.

The last ingredients to choose are the herbs and spices. It's best to use fresh, whole herbs where you can. Thyme, sage, parsley, oregano and bay leaves are my usual choices. To make life easy, use some food safe string like butcher's twine to tie the herbs into a bundle, and tie the other end of the string to one of the pot handles, or to a wooden spoon. This will allow you to remove it easily. The last spice to add is pepper corns, which you can just toss in. One thing I don't add is salt, because I can always add it to the recipes I use the stock in.

There is some argument as to whether you should roast the chicken bones before using them to make stock. Honestly, there is only a small difference in the flavor, so I don't think it's worth the effort to roast bones. However, if the chicken was already roasted you won't have to go to that effort. It's true that bones from a whole roast will have given up some of their flavor, but the quality of flavor from the roasting will make up for it.

When you have all your ingredients in a soup pot, add just enough cold water to submerge the ingredients. It's very important that the water be cold, as different organic molecules will get extracted at different temperatures. A slow increase in temperature will allow time for this extraction to occur.

Bring the water to a simmer, not a full boil, and keep it there for at least two hours. From time to time add some hot water to replace what is lost in evaporation. Also, be sure to keep the ingredients submerged. A collapsible basket steamer turned upside down is a great way to do this. As the stock simmers you will get a layer of scum on the top, which should be skimmed off occasionally.

When you are done simmering, use tongs to get the bigger bones and veggies out, and then use a ladle to transfer most of the liquid to another pot. When it's safe to do so, pour the remaining liquid through a strainer to remove the small solids, and return all the liquid back to the soup pot. Bring it back to heat, and reduce the liquid by gently boiling it. Reducing the stock will intensify the flavor, and if you reduce it by half you should notice that the stock has a slightly jelly-like consistency when it cools down. This is a good indication you have extracted lots of good stuff from the bones, because it's the collagen in the bones and joint tissue that makes the stock jiggly, and it's full of flavor and nutrients.

You can use the stock right away, or store it in the fridge for about three days, or in the freezer indefinitely.

The whole process is simpler than it sounds, but it does take time and attention. But if you try it, I think you'll agree it is well worth the effort.

Erik Christensen is an enthusiastic home cook and has been sharing what he has learned on the Internet for over seven years. If you have found this article useful, visit his soup site at http://www.homemade-soup-recipes.com for more great ideas.

Source: EzineArticles
Was this Helpful ?

 
0
 
0
 
Rate this Article
 vote(s)
Feedback
Print
Re-Publish

Article Tags:

Chicken Stock

,

Good Chicken Stock

,

Chicken Bones

,

Easy Recipe

Summer is a great time for crock pot recipes. It may be hot and humid outside, but you still need to make dinner for you and your family. You can’t barbecue every day. The weather won’t let you.

By: Reggie Bean l Food and Drink > Crockpot Recipes l October 25, 2012 lViews: 222

My favorite meal of the day has always been breakfast. Nothing beats the cooking odors emanating from the kitchen in the morning. Fresh brewed coffee and sizzling bacon are two of the most

By: Reggie Bean l Food and Drink > Recipes l October 25, 2012 lViews: 269

My first bratwurst was grilled and on a bun. That’s all it took to supplant polish sausage as my new number one. Luckily I’m part German, so there is no Polish guilt. I now try to incorporate

By: Reggie Bean l Food and Drink > Recipes l October 25, 2012 lViews: 342

Football season is upon us once again. Whether you are a fan or a disgruntled spouse, there is no reason you can't have an enjoyable day stuffing your face. Walk away from the processed frozen

By: Reggie Bean l Food and Drink > Recipes l October 25, 2012 lViews: 448

Crock pot recipes are perfect for football Sunday. When you wake up in the morning, just set up the crock pot with your favorite appetizer, barbecue or Sunday dinner and it will be ready to eat

By: Reggie Bean l Food and Drink > Crockpot Recipes l October 25, 2012 lViews: 220

Navy beans (as in most other beans) are high in dietary fiber which means it will help you feel full faster because they are so high in fiber. They are high in folate, magnesium, thiamin, iron, and

By: Jaya Patel l Food and Drink > Soups l July 13, 2012 lViews: 245

Navy beans (as in most other beans) are high in dietary fiber which means it will help you feel full faster because they are so high in fiber. They are high in folate, magnesium, thiamin, iron, and

By: Jaya Patell Food and Drink > Soupsl July 13, 2012 lViews: 245

Ham bone soup makes a delicious economical and tasty meal. It is an ideal dish to be slow cooked during the day or overnight. However add a little sparkle to the dish be more adventurous, the recipe

By: Henry Lordl Food and Drink > Soupsl July 13, 2012 lViews: 248

You are probably wondering about the perfect food that is quick and easy to prepare, has myriads of choices of ingredients, benefits you with better health, and is cost effective to make? Then, the

By: Artem Lebedevl Food and Drink > Soupsl June 21, 2012 lViews: 150

Cold Soup served on a warm Summer day can be an a complete meal when it is just to hot to be standing over a stove. Gazpacho Soup is an answer to those times. This recipe and the ideas that are

By: William H Chaneyl Food and Drink > Soupsl June 07, 2012 lViews: 151

After the savory scent is detected, the mouth waters as the salivary glands are activated. Then, the stomach grumbles in anticipation of the upcoming dinner. No matter what gluten-free soup recipe is

By: Jennifer S Rigbyl Food and Drink > Soupsl May 21, 2012 lViews: 192

Soups quite easily reduced to the level of primitive and tasteless meals, if they are prepared without adequate training and, more importantly, without an understanding of their specific properties.

By: Eric J Forman Jrl Food and Drink > Soupsl April 22, 2012 lViews: 181

Classic French onion soup is a perfect of example of how a small number of simple ingredients can be turned into something amazing. Despite its reputation as a being a difficult recipe with lots of

By: Erik Christensenl Food and Drink > Soupsl March 31, 2012 lViews: 158

Starchy vegetables have a long history of being used to make tasty and nutritious soups. Potatoes, pumpkin, butternut squash, zucchini, peas and beets are all main ingredients for soups all around

By: Erik Christensenl Food and Drink > Soupsl March 26, 2012 lViews: 153

I love soup, and of all the recipes I know by heart, split pea and ham soup is one of my favorites. Yellow split pea soup has a long history in Quebec where I was born, and it still feels reminds me

By: Erik Christensenl Food and Drink > Soupsl March 26, 2012 lViews: 128

Discuss this Article

comments powered by Disqus