Author Box
Articles Categories
All Categories
Articles Resources

Review: The French Connection

March 27, 2012 | Comments: 0 | Views: 150

Gene Hackman has had a very long career that stood out for many years. One of his most notable roles in the eyes of both critics and fans alike is his role in The French Connection. It garnered him a win for Best Actor and is one of his most highly regarded films to date.

Jimmy "Popeye" Doyle (Gene Hackman) is a cop who follows his instincts and seems to play hunches. When he and his partner Buddy Russo (Roy Scheider) catch wind of something, they end up playing one of his hunches and begin to try to track down some people who they believe are shipping heroine on to U.S. soil. They run into a host of potential criminals who may have a hand in this deal involving narcotics and they also have to prove to their superiors that the case is legitimate. If they don't prove it, all of their work may go up in smoke.

The French Connection involves what appears to be some hard-nosed police work from the 1960′s and 70′s. I say "appears to be" because I wasn't alive during that time and I don't know how they handled their business back then. I do know that the cops were allowed to be rougher and more aggressive during this time frame based on what I've heard, so I'm sure at least some of their tactics they used in this movie may be fairly accurate.

This movie is given what you might call an unglamourus look at police life. It's not that it's really gritty or overly harsh or anything, it's just plain and not overdone. This style makes the movie more realistic in a sense. The French Connection is a straight up film about police procedure. It follows some detectives on the job trying to take down who they believe are lawbreakers and are attempting to crack what may be a very large case with international importance.

The story and how it was laid out is what makes the movie as good as it is. In my opinion, the actors didn't have to do too much because of the way everything is placed on camera. The actors portray their roles and go through what they're asked to do, but the true stars of The French Connection are the script, director Philip D'Antoni and the film itself.

This is not a deep movie with a complex storyline or anything like that. It's straight forward and it has a lineal story that remains glued on the investigation throughout the film's duration. Unlike most movies, they're able to take something without much to offer in terms of diversity and manage to stretch it out into a feature-length film without adding a bunch of unnecessary and boring scenes to it.

Everything unfolds in a slow, but solid pace as we find out much of what's going on at the same time the detectives do. This makes virtually everything about the movie more interesting and it never allows the movie to fall flat or lets the viewer become bored. This should be a lesson for filmmakers everywhere when working on something that doesn't contain a lot of material. The director manages to successfully keep you engaged by simply being smart.

D'Antoni goes through three different modes to tell the story and I'll describe them like this: There's the "stop and frisk" mode, which shows the aggression of the cops and some of what they could get away with at that time. There's "investigation" mode, which is really the core of the film and delivers a good amount of suspense. The third and final mode would be what I would call "action" mode. This mode is entertaining, fast paced and adds some gritty aspects to the film. All of those modes are pieced together nicely to create a movie that's fluid all the way through.

When it comes to the characters, none of them were unrealistic or flashy and I liked that here. I also liked the fact that they didn't make the heroes out to be flawless. The movie's protagonist is probably the type of cop that you may run into at times and is clearly on the racist side. That's something you don't see in many movies. The "good guy" is on the right side of the law, but may not actually be all that good of a person. It's fitting, because The French Connection is loosely based on some actual people and the events that they were a part of.

The French Connection showed some great work from its director. This is probably his best movie, but he also had a few other ones that stand out. It would have been cool to see him do many more films, but he stopped in order to focus on other things in the world of entertainment. His style was refreshing and unique and that's always good to see in Hollywood.

Score: 4/5

Rating: R

Director: Philip D'Antoni

Cast: Gene Hackman Roy Scheider Fernando Rey Tony Lo Bianco Marcel Bozzuffi

Film Length: 104 minutes

Release Date: October 9, 1971

Distributor: 20th Century Fox

http://www.themoviepictureshow.com/

Source: EzineArticles
Was this Helpful ?

 
0
 
0
 
Rate this Article
 vote(s)
Feedback
Print
Re-Publish

Article Tags:

French Connection

,

Gene Hackman

,

Movie

,

Film

,

Review

,

1971

,

Philip D Antoni

,

Roy Scheider

When we are looking for an efficient way to keep your house cool during the hot summer months, one of the first things to consider is using a portable ac unit. Portable air conditioners are great for

By: Akshita l Shopping Product Reviews > Electronics l July 09, 2013 lViews: 651

The people who are not satisfied with their original hair can get any type and style of hairs. Yes it is true, everyone can get hair style of their own choice. If you want long, short hair, straight,

By: Jenette Kimberly l Shopping Product Reviews > Fashion Style l April 01, 2013 lViews: 602

The teddy bear has brought comfort and cheer to millions of children for more than a century. As amazing and timeless a toy that this is today it’s not so humble beginnings has been linked back to

By: TeddyBear l Shopping Product Reviews > Toys l December 11, 2012 lViews: 508

Women love trendy fashion. Be it for their clothing, jewellery or fashion accessories. Choosing any trendy clothing will depend on your figure shape the design of the clothes, the age of the wearer,

By: Zuneaoy l Shopping Product Reviews > Fashion Style l December 10, 2012 lViews: 257

Fashion jewelry serves a slightly different purpose than fine jewelry. Most people don’t wear their fine jewelry, outside of wedding rings of course, as part of everyday outfits. Instead, fashion

By: Zuneaoy l Shopping Product Reviews > Fashion Style l December 09, 2012 lViews: 258

Well you might be wondering about an online jewellery stores reputation when buying your jewellery online. This can be a concern, especially if the pieces you are buying are expensive. But make sure

By: Zuneaoy l Shopping Product Reviews > Collectible Jewelry l December 05, 2012 lViews: 266

The romantic comedy, "While You Were Sleeping," starring Academy Award winning actress Sandra Bullock and Bill Pullman, is an enchanting and engaging movie, well worth your purchasing. The star

By: April Braswelll Shopping Product Reviews > Movie Reviewsl June 07, 2012 lViews: 247

High school student Peter Parker is bitten by a mutant spider giving him superhuman strength and senses. He begins to fight evil in New York City.

By: Kevin Dillehayl Shopping Product Reviews > Movie Reviewsl June 07, 2012 lViews: 232

Vincent (Tomer Gazit Sisley) gets involved with a group of drug dealers when he steals a boatload of their cocaine. These guys want what is owed to them and they'll do whatever is necessary to obtain

By: Jaskee Hickmanl Shopping Product Reviews > Movie Reviewsl June 02, 2012 lViews: 218

When Paul (Jonathan Sadowski) gets a visit from his brother Chris (Jesse McCartney), his brother's fiance Natalie (Olivia Taylor Dudley) and there recently single friend Amanda (Devin Kelley), they

By: Jaskee Hickmanl Shopping Product Reviews > Movie Reviewsl June 02, 2012 lViews: 197

The story in Men in Black III unfolds as a new and more dangerous alien arrives on the scene to destroy the world and kill Agent K (Tommy Lee Jones). It is then that his partner Agent J (Will Smith)

By: Jaskee Hickmanl Shopping Product Reviews > Movie Reviewsl June 02, 2012 lViews: 194

Alex Hopper (Taylor Kitsch) is an irresponsible young man with no direction in life. After getting into trouble, his military brother Stone (Alexander Skarsgard) forces him to enlist in the Navy out

By: Jaskee Hickmanl Shopping Product Reviews > Movie Reviewsl May 27, 2012 lViews: 195

Vincent (Tomer Gazit Sisley) gets involved with a group of drug dealers when he steals a boatload of their cocaine. These guys want what is owed to them and they'll do whatever is necessary to obtain

By: Jaskee Hickmanl Shopping Product Reviews > Movie Reviewsl June 02, 2012 lViews: 218

When Paul (Jonathan Sadowski) gets a visit from his brother Chris (Jesse McCartney), his brother's fiance Natalie (Olivia Taylor Dudley) and there recently single friend Amanda (Devin Kelley), they

By: Jaskee Hickmanl Shopping Product Reviews > Movie Reviewsl June 02, 2012 lViews: 197

The story in Men in Black III unfolds as a new and more dangerous alien arrives on the scene to destroy the world and kill Agent K (Tommy Lee Jones). It is then that his partner Agent J (Will Smith)

By: Jaskee Hickmanl Shopping Product Reviews > Movie Reviewsl June 02, 2012 lViews: 194

Alex Hopper (Taylor Kitsch) is an irresponsible young man with no direction in life. After getting into trouble, his military brother Stone (Alexander Skarsgard) forces him to enlist in the Navy out

By: Jaskee Hickmanl Shopping Product Reviews > Movie Reviewsl May 27, 2012 lViews: 195

Jason Bourne (Matt Damon) is still on the move and doing all he can to find out about his past. He decides that starting from the beginning is his best option and he thinks he's found someone that

By: Jaskee Hickmanl Shopping Product Reviews > Movie Reviewsl May 27, 2012 lViews: 174

Jason Bourne (Matt Damon) is still trying to put his past together as he's trying to gain his memory back with the help Marie (Franka Potente). Bourne and Marie have moved to a secluded area where

By: Jaskee Hickmanl Shopping Product Reviews > Movie Reviewsl May 27, 2012 lViews: 176

Discuss this Article

comments powered by Disqus